Publications

Link to my Academia.edu or Google Scholar pages for most current information about published work.

Journal Articles

Sovereignty, Nationhood and International Norms: Reactions to the 2010 Osh Violence in Kyrgyzstan“. Nationalities Papers, 43(3) (2015):  417-436.

LGBT Human Rights versus ‘Traditional Values’: The Rise and Contestation of Anti-Homopropaganda Laws in Russia“. Journal of Human Rights, 13(3) (2014): 363-379.

Special issue: Not Such an International Human Rights Norm? Local Resistance to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Rights—Preliminary Comments“. Journal of Human Rights, 13(3) (2014): 249-255. Co-authored with Anthony J. Langlois.

From Blogging Central Asia to Citizen Media: A Practitioners’ Perspective on the Evolution of neweurasia“. Europe-Asia Studies, 64(8) (2012): 1395-1414. Co-authored with Yelena Jetpyspayeva.

Give a State a Bad Name?: Kyrgyzstan and the Risk of State Failure“, Global Dialogue 13(1) (2011).

What’s in a Name?: The Personal and Political Meanings of LGBT for Non-Heterosexual and Transgender Youth in KyrgyzstanCentral Asian Survey.  29(4) (2010): 485-499. Co-authored with Anna Kirey.

Developing Russian Aural Self-Study Materials for Advanced HE LearnersRusistika 34 (2009): 17-22.

The Copenhagen School on Tour in Kyrgyzstan: Is Securitization Theory Useable Outside Europe?Security Dialogue 38(1), (2007): 5-25.

Book Chapters

“Securitization and Development”. In Jackson, Paul (ed.) (2015) The Handbook of International Security and Development, Edward Elgar Publishers: 32-46.

“LGBT Activism in Kyrgyzstan: What Role for Europe?” Chapter in Ayoub, Phillip and David Paternotte (eds.) (2014) Transnational LGBT activism and the Making of Europe: A Rainbow Europe?, Palgrave: 50-72.

“Development in Kyrgyzstan: Failed State or Failed State-Building?” Chapter in Ware, Anthony (ed.) (2014) Fragile, Failed, Pariah: Development in Difficult Socio-Political Contexts, Palgrave: 137-162.

“More Problem than Solution? Managing the Practical Challenges of PBL Course Delivery”. Chapter in Coleman, K.S. & Flood, A. (eds.)  (2013) Disciplines: The Lenses of Learning, Common Ground Publishing LLC. University Press: 67-92.

“Not Just Finding What You (Thought You) Were Looking For: Field Data and Theory”. Chapter in Yanow, Dvora and Schwartz-Shea, Peri. (eds.) (2013) Interpretation and Method (2nd edn), M.E. Sharpe: 387-405.

“Ethnographic Methods”. In Shepherd, Laura J. (ed.) (2013) Critical Approaches to Security: An introduction to theories and methods, Routledge: 129-145.

“The Limits of Spoken Words: From Meta-narratives to Experiences of Security”. In Balzacq, Thierry (ed.) (2010) Securitization Theory: How Security Problems Emerge and Dissolve, Routledge: 94-115.

“International Agency in Kyrgyzstan: Rhetoric, Revolution & Renegotiation”. In Kavalski, Emilian (ed.)  (2010) Stable Outside, Fragile Inside?: Post-Soviet Statehood in Central Asia, Ashgate: 113-154.

Positioning ‘Security’ and Securing One’s Position: The Researcher’s Role in Investigating ‘Security’ in Kyrgyzstan“. In Wall, Caleb & Peter Mollinga (eds.) (2008) Field Work in Difficult Environments: Discussing the Divergence between Theory and Practice, Lit Verlag: 43-63.

“You Say Security, We Say Safety: Speaking and Talking ‘Security’ in Kyrgyzstan”. In Methodologies in Peace Research, Centre for Peace Studies Working Papers No. 10, University of Tromsø, (2007): 183-194.

Other

Kyrgyzstan’s Anti-Gay Bill: Just Following in Russia’s Footsteps?“, Eurasianet, 30 October 2014.

“Putting Traditional Values into Practice: Russia’s Anti-Gay Laws”, Russian Analytical Digest, No. 138, 8 November 2013: 5-7.

Russia’s Anti-Gay Laws: The Politics and Consequences of a Moral Panic“, The Disorder of Things (blog), 23 June 2013.

Kyrgyzstan: One Billion Rising Comes to Bishkek“, Eurasianet, 14 February 2013.

Uncomfortable Questions Remain Unanswered in Kyrgyzstan“, The Ruritanian, Summer 2010: 5.

Violent Clashes in Kyrgyzstan“, International Development Department Blog, University of Birmingham, 20 June 2010.

Kyrgyzstan: e-Revolution“, Eurasianet, 21 July 2005.

 

Page last updated 16 August 2015

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